dispersing & reflecting light through poetry

Posts tagged ‘death’

ORANGE Death

I think death–physical, spiritual, emotional–colors the first half of my next chapbook, ORANGE.

Terra Cotta Soldiers
“Let the dead bury the dead.” –Jesus of Nazareth

dried clay
brittle broken
cracked and fallen
astonishing detail of
upright individuals in
grand ancient army formation
layered soil and sand of the centuries
standing guard over a dead emperor’s tomb
all ready for war
yet they’re not moving
they’ve already lost

Image & Text Copyright © 2016 Scott Daniel Massey

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Smelling ORANGE

One of the first poems completed for ORANGE is another list poem. This list is a bit different in a couple ways. First, each line describes a distinctive scent of fall, at least from my western Michigan youth. So as you read through take your time with each line. If you’re familiar with the odor, try to recall it. They say that memories are strongly connected to our sense of smell.

Secondly, the list actually has story. There is some progression. It’s not a true story from my life, but it does convey truth.

The Scent of Autumn

the air first thing in the morning
wet leaves in the gutter
seats on the school bus
dry corn stalks
fresh cow manure
chalk dust and pencil shavings
cafeteria food
sweat suits and running shoes
          left in the locker room
paraffin and charred pumpkin
candy corn
a blend of Gatorade®, heat rub,
          and muddy, torn-up turf
burning leaves
instant coffee
Thanksgiving dinner
wool letterman jackets
Miller High Life® in aluminum cans
a freshly opened condom
hay
dirt roads after the rain
rotted apples under the trees
leaking coolant, oil, and gas
moist earth from an open grave

Copyright © 2015 Scott Daniel Massey

At the Center of RED

“Red is the color of the blood that flowed…”
from “The Coloring Song” by Petra

At the center of human history stands One.
Lived One.
Died One.
Resurrected One.

Today I give you the first of the three centerpiece poems depicting Christ.

Seeds of Faith

Great drops of blood
planted in the dust
of a lonely garden,
transplanted on a hill
to bloom and bring forth fruit
from a crack
in a rock.

Copyright © 2015 Scott Daniel Massey

RED–Parallel Universe…Again

Adam

Called from clay,
six foot of sand and soil
converted to perfect flesh,
unearthed from the bowels below,
exhumed and animated
     to breathe new air,
     to gulp God gasped respiration;
come to life from under the rock,
standing,
the first of your kind–
the dirty womb and its bloody placenta
now under your feet.

“Adam” compliments “Native”, a companion poem, they are parallel. I think I accomplished this parallel best of the lot.

Whereas, “Native” shows the fall of man and his banishment from the garden, “Adam” seems to take us back to his original creation. You can see man being formed from the ground; being lifted to his feet to breathe for the first time. And you get the sense that it is good, triumphant even. And it is.

But the poem also describes ‘the last Adam’. I Corinthians 15 is an incredible chapter that details the resurrection of the dead. Go ahead. Take a read. I’ll wait right here.

Quick summary: Because of the fall of Adam, the first man, everyone gets to experience death; because of the death and resurrection of Christ, ‘the last Adam’, everyone has an opportunity to experience real life after death. Death and the grave, ‘the dirty womb and it’s bloody placent’, have been defeated by Christ. “Native” is the worldview or problem, if you will; “Adam” the heavenview, solution.

Copyright © 2015 Scott Daniel Massey

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